Norway’s Auto-Dimming Street Lamps get Brighter Only as Traffic Approaches

 

  • Along a highway in Norway LED lights dim to 20 percent when no cars are near
  • As a car passes a radar sensor attached to the lights, lights turn to a 100 percent
  • The five-mile stretch of energy-saving street lights saves 2,100 kWH per week 
  • Using LED lights helps reduce CO2 emissions compared to other types of lights 

Norway has installed auto-dimming street lights in parts of the country in hopes of decreasing its carbon footprint.

Along a five-mile stretch of a highway near Hole, Norway, outside of Oslo, LED lights dim to 20 percent when no cars, bikes or pedestrians are in the area.

When a car – or a cyclist or pedestrian for that matter – passes a radar sensor attached to the street lights, the lights turn to a full 100 per cent, allowing people to have full sight of what’s ahead of them.

After the car passes, the lights return to 20 per cent to save energy when they’re not needed.

The five-mile stretch of energy-saving lights saves 2,100 kWH per week, which would amount to approximately 21 hours of ironing, or four hours of watching TV on a plasma screen.

Using LED lights helps reduce CO2 emissions by using less power compared to halogen and fluorescent sources.

While it is unclear how much the installation cost, it the government will break even after just 4.5 years, according to Youtuber Bjørn Nyland.

Light-related energy saving programs have popped up across Norway, with similar auto lights being put in on the western side of the state last year.

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02 Jan